34 suspected online cheats, money mules under investigation, Channel NewsAsia

24 men and 10 women are suspected to be involved in 88 cases of online scams involving more than S$165,000, said police.

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High-tech extortion attacks nearly doubled in first quarter, report says, Today Online

BERLIN — High-tech extortion schemes nearly doubled in the first three months of this year, while attacks on Adobe Flash software used in streaming media and casual game sites quadrupled, a global report said today (June 9).
Intel Corp’s McAfee Labs Threats Report for May found that ransomware surged 165 per cent in the first quarter, rebounding from a slight dip earlier last year when police agencies worldwide staged a coordinated crackdown to knock out a major ransomware network.
Ramsomware is malware which cybercriminals use to seize control of computer and phones when unwitting users click on an infected link or download a tainted document, locking them out of all access to their devices unless they make ransom payments.

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Protecting mobile phone data against malicious apps, Today Online

This commentary is part of a series in TODAY’s Science section, in collaboration with the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) School of Computing, that explores computer science research projects conducted here.
As mobile phones are increasingly used for a wide range of services beyond phone calls, such as banking and health data storage, hackers are seeking new ways to exploit the data in mobile devices. The decentralised access control in the cloud-based applications and malware on mobile devices have made data protection in the cloud/mobile environment a daunting task.
Attacks can come in a variety of ways: SMS, WhatsApp, or email, luring the user to open a link that will install malware. Once the user clicks on the link, the malware app will be installed in the mobile phone, intercepting and stealing personal data, such as SMS messages, emails, and contact information. On a “rooted” Android device, which has been modified by users to gain more privilege, malware apps can intercept all data and user behaviour on the device.

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